Marijuana Fights Cancer and Helps Manage Side Effects, Researchers Find

Mounting evidence shows ‘cannabinoids’ in marijuana slow cancer growth, inhibit formation of new blood cells that feed a tumor, and help manage pain, fatigue, nausea, and other side effects.

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) induces apoptosis in C6 glioma cells

Pathways mediating the effects of cannabidiol on the reduction of breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis

Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells

Cannabidiol inhibits cancer cell invasion via upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1.

 

Marijuana use produced substantial increase in food intake among HIV-positive patients

“Individuals with HIV constitute the largest group using cannabinoids for medicinal reasons; yet, no studies have directly compared the tolerability and efficacy of smoked marijuana and oral dronabinol maintenance in HIV-positive marijuana smokers. This placebo-controlled within-subjects study evaluated marijuana and dronabinol across a range of behaviors: eating topography, mood, cognitive performance, physiologic measures, and sleep.”

“…. data suggest that for HIV-positive marijuana smokers, both dronabinol (at doses 8 times current recommendations) and marijuana were well tolerated and produced substantial and comparable increases in food intake.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Dronabinol and Marijuana in HIV-Positive Marijuana Smokers: Caloric Intake, Mood, and Sleep

Smoked cannabis relieved neuropathic pain in patients with HIV

Abstract

“In a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial of the short-term adjunctive treatment of neuropathic pain in HIV-associated distal sensory polyneuropathy, participants received either smoked cannabis or placebo cannabis cigarettes…

Among completers, pain relief was significantly greater with cannabis than placebo. The proportion of subjects achieving at least 30% pain relief was again significantly greater with cannabis (46%) compared to placebo (18%). It was concluded that smoked cannabis was generally well-tolerated and effective when added to concomitant analgesic therapy in patients with medically refractory pain due to HIV-associated neuropathy.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Cannabis in painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®) National Cancer Institute – Questions and Answers About Cannabis

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

 

THC is also more effective at blocking clumps of protein that can inhibit memory and cognition in Alzheimer’s patients

Research done by the Scripps Research Institute in California shows that the active ingredient in marijuana, THC, prevents the formation of deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease. THC was found to prevent an enzyme called acetylcholinesterase from accelerating the formation of “Alzheimer plaques” in the brain more effectively than commercially marketed drugs. THC is also more effective at blocking clumps of protein that can inhibit memory and cognition in Alzheimer’s patients, as reported in Molecular Pharmaceutics.

Abstract

“…with the ever-increasing size of this population, cases of Alzheimer’s disease are expected to triple over the next 50 years. Consequently, the development of treatments that slow or halt the disease progression have become imperative to both improve the quality of life for patients as well as reduce the health care costs attributable to Alzheimer’s disease…Compared to currently approved drugs prescribed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease…this study provides a previously unrecognized molecular mechanism through which cannabinoid molecules may directly impact the progression of this debilitating disease.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

The Analgesic Effect of Vaporized Cannabis on Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

Abstract

“The analgesia obtained from a low dose of THC (1.29%) is a meaningful outcome was clinically significant…cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Report of a parent survey of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use in pediatric treatment-resistant epilepsy

Abstract

“Severe childhood epilepsies are characterized by frequent seizures, neurodevelopmental delays, and impaired quality of life. In these treatment-resistant epilepsies, families often seek alternative treatments. This survey explored the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis in children with treatment-resistant epilepsy.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Cannabinoids: potential anti-tumour agents

Abstract

Various reports have shown that cannabinoids (the active components of marijuana and their derivatives) can reduce tumour growth and progression in animal models of cancer, in addition to their well-known palliative effects on some cancer-associated symptoms. This Opinion article discusses our current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of action, including emerging resistance mechanisms and opportunities for combination therapy approaches. Such knowledge is required for the optimization of preclinical cannabinoid-based therapies and for the preliminary clinical testing that is currently underway.

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Cannabidiol (THC:CBD) extract relieved pain in patients with advanced cancer

Abstract

“…study showed THC:CBD extract is efficacious for relief of pain in patients with advanced cancer pain not fully relieved by strong opioids.”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications:

Cannabis-based medicine protected against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Abstract

“Compared with a placebo, cannabis-based medicine (CBM) added to standard antiemetic therapy was well tolerated and provided better protection against delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). ”

Clinical Trials, Studies and Publications: